Social inequality and race

A new Pew Research Center survey finds profound differences between black and white adults in their views on racial discrimination, barriers to black progress and the prospects for change. Blacks, far more than whites, say black people are treated unfairly across different realms of life, from dealing with the police to applying for a loan or mortgage.

Social inequality and race

PinIt Instapaper Pocket Email Print Our nation, at its best, pursues the ideal that what we look like and where we come from should not determine the benefits, burdens, or responsibilities that we bear in our society.

Because we believe that all people are created equal in terms of rights, dignity, and the potential to achieve great things, we see inequality based on race, gender, and other social characteristics as not only unfortunate but unjust. The value of equality, democratic voice, physical and economic security, social mobility, a shared sense of responsibility for one another, and a chance to start over after misfortune or missteps -- what many Americans call redemption -- are the moral pillars of the American ideal of opportunity.

Many Americans of goodwill who want to reduce poverty believe that race is no longer relevant to understanding the problem, or to fashioning solutions for it. This view often reflects compassion as well as pragmatism.

But we cannot solve the problem of poverty -- or, indeed, be the country that we aspire to be -- unless we honestly unravel the complex and continuing connection between poverty and race. Experience shows, moreover, that reductions in poverty do not reliably reduce racial inequality, nor do they inevitably reach low-income people of color.

Social inequality and race

Rising economic tides do not reliably lift all boats. Inafter a decade of remarkable economic prosperity, the poverty rate among African Americans and Latinos taken together was still 2.

This disparity was stunning, yet it was the smallest difference in poverty rates between whites and others in more than three decades. And from toas the economy slowed, poverty rates for most communities of color increased more dramatically than they did for whites, widening the racial poverty gap.

From towhile the overall number of poor Americans declined by almost 1 million, to 37 million, poverty rates for most communities of color actually increased. Reductions in poverty do not inevitably close racial poverty gaps, nor do they reach all ethnic communities equally.

Poor people of color are also increasingly more likely than whites to find themselves living in high-poverty neighborhoods with limited resources and limited options. Low-income Latino families were three times as likely as low-income white families to live in these neighborhoods inbut 5.

Low-income blacks were 3. These numbers are troubling not because living among poor people is somehow harmful in itself, but because concentrated high-poverty communities are far more likely to be cut off from quality schools, housing, health care, affordable consumer credit, and other pathways out of poverty.

And African Americans and Latinos are increasingly more likely than whites to live in those communities. Today, low-income blacks are more than three times as likely as poor whites to be in "deep poverty" -- meaning below half the poverty line -- while poor Latinos are more than twice as likely.

The Persistence of Discrimination Modern and historical forces combine to keep many communities of color disconnected from networks of economic opportunity and upward mobility. Among those forces is persistent racial discrimination that, while subtler than in past decades, continues to deny opportunity to millions of Americans.

Decent employment and housing are milestones on the road out of poverty. Yet these are areas in which racial discrimination stubbornly persists. While the open hostility and "Whites Only" signs of the Jim Crow era have largely disappeared, research shows that identically qualified candidates for jobs and housing enjoy significantly different opportunities depending on their race.

In recent studies in Milwaukee and New York City, meanwhile, live "tester pairs" with comparable qualifications but of differing races tested not only the effect of race on job prospects but also the impact of an apparent criminal record. In Milwaukee, whites reporting a criminal record were more likely to receive a callback from employers than were blacks without a criminal record.Apr 22,  · Inequality, Race, and Remedy.

Alan Jenkins we see inequality based on race, gender, and other social characteristics as not only unfortunate but unjust. The value of equality, democratic voice, physical and economic security, social mobility, a shared sense of responsibility for one another, and a chance to start over after.

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Social inequality and race

Social inequality is the existence of unequal opportunities and rewards for different social positions or statuses within a group or society. Let's. Unequal Opportunity: Race and Education Linda and students routinely receive dramatically different learning opportunities based on their social status.

The Nature of Educational Inequality. Race in America. The University of Pittsburgh has set the stage for a solution-focused dialogue on race, one that will bring together some of the best minds on this important subject.

Pitt’s School of Social Work and the school's Center on Race and Social Problems will host Race in America: Restructuring Inequality, a national conference in Pittsburgh, Pa.

Mexico may celebrate its mixed-race heritage, but a new study shows that racism is powerful there. Darker-skinned Mexicans earn less and finish fewer years of schooling than white citizens.

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