Euclid the father of geometry

The degrees of Freemasonry are, then, the steps by which the candidate ascends from a lower to a higher condition of knowledge. Mackey, The Encyclopedia of Freemasonry Each of the degrees requires the candidate to participate in the drama being presented. They are all of a very serious nature and not in the least demeaning of the candidate.

Euclid the father of geometry

Email Print Abraham Lincoln was not an especially well-read man, but what he read he retained, thought about and frequently used. One author he was fond of was the Greek mathematician Euclid. He studied and nearly mastered the Six-books of Euclid geometry since he was a member of Congress.

Jun 15,  · Geometry lies at the root of all drawing, so it's good to know a little about it. This is the first video in a series which will explain the basics of Euclid's Elements of Geometry. Don't be. Euclid enters history as one of the greatest of all mathematicians and he is often referred to as the father of geometry. Euclid (/ ˈ juː k l ɪ d /; Ancient Greek: Εὐκλείδης – Eukleídēs, pronounced [rutadeltambor.coměː.dɛːs]; fl. BC), sometimes given the name Euclid of Alexandria to distinguish him from Euclides of Megara, was a Greek mathematician, often referred to as the "founder of geometry" or the "father of geometry". He was active in Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (– BC).

He began a course of rigid mental discipline with the intent to improve his faculties, especially his powers of logic and language. Hence his fondness for Euclid, which he carried with him on the circuit till he could demonstrate with ease all the propositions in the six books; often studying far into the night, with a candle near his pillow, while his fellow-lawyers, half a dozen in a room, filled the air with interminable snoring.

Lincoln wrote about why he decided to study Euclid: I thought at first that I understood its meaning, but soon became satisfied that I did not. I said to myself, What do I do when I demonstrate more than when I reason or prove? How does demonstration differ from any other proof?

Intro to Euclidean geometry

I thought a great many things were proved beyond the possibility of doubt, without recourse to any such extraordinary process of reasoning as I understood demonstration to be. I consulted all the dictionaries and books of reference I could find, but with no better results.

You might as well have defined blue to a blind man. I then found out what demonstrate means, and went back to my law studies. In the fourth Lincoln Douglas debate Lincoln used Euclid to illustrate a point: If you have ever studied geometry, you remember that by a course of reasoning, Euclid proves that all the angles in a triangle are equal to two right angles.

Euclid has shown you how to work it out. Now, if you undertake to disprove that proposition, and to show that it is erroneous, would you prove it to be false by calling Euclid a liar?

Euclid the father of geometry

In a speech in Columbus, Ohio inEuclid came up again: There are two ways of establishing a proposition. One is by trying to demonstrate it upon reason, and the other is, to show that great men in former times have thought so and so, and thus to pass it by the weight of pure authority.

Now, if Judge Douglas will demonstrate somehow that this is popular sovereignty,—the right of one man to make a slave of another, without any right in that other, or anyone else to object,—demonstrate it as Euclid demonstrated propositions,—there is no objection.

But when he comes forward, seeking to carry a principle by bringing it to the authority of men who themselves utterly repudiate that principle, I ask that he shall not be permitted to do it. However Lincoln did not merely cite Euclid in speeches, but used him in his private thoughts about slavery.

In an unpublished note from on slavery: It is color, then; the lighter, having the right to enslave the darker?

Fellowcraft Degree

By this rule, you are to be slave to the first man you meet, with a fairer skin than your own. You do not mean color exactly?

By this rule, you are to be slave to the first man you meet, with an intellect superior to your own. But, say you, it is a question of interest; and, if you can make it your interest, you have the right to enslave another.

And if he can make it his interest, he has the right to enslave you. Lincoln throughout his life was fascinated by logic and mathematics. In considering him as a thinker, it is always best to keep this in mind when looking at his thought processes as reflected in his writings and his speeches.

More to explorer PopeWatch: Thanks to co-blogger Bob Kurland who brought this to the attention of PopeWatch: Most are utterly forgotten soon after they November 18, I was a Junior in college at the time.

The late seventies had.In mathematics, non-Euclidean geometry consists of two geometries based on axioms closely related to those specifying Euclidean rutadeltambor.com Euclidean geometry lies at the intersection of metric geometry and affine geometry, non-Euclidean geometry arises when either the metric requirement is relaxed, or the parallel postulate is replaced with an alternative one.

Major branches of geometry He was likely born c.

Contemporary Form and Function Named after the father of Geometry, the Euclid Ceiling Fan provides a streamlined look with a modern geometric design.

Euclid was a great mathematician and often called the father of geometry. Learn more about Euclid and how some of our math concepts came about and how influential they have become. Euclid enters history as one of the greatest of all mathematicians and he is often referred to as the father of geometry.

Euclid's Axioms and Postulates. One interesting question about the assumptions for Euclid's system of geometry is the difference between the "axioms" and the "postulates." "Axiom" is from Greek axíôma, "worthy."An axiom is in some sense thought to be strongly self-evident.

In the fourth Lincoln Douglas debate Lincoln used Euclid to illustrate a point: If you have ever studied geometry, you remember that by a course of reasoning, Euclid proves that all the angles in a triangle are equal to two right angles.

Euclidean geometry - Wikipedia